The Muscles You're Actually Working When You Do a Plank
2024/02/15

ADVERTISEMENT

Strength training is often associated with movement, but holding still can be just as effective. The plank exercise, in particular, is highly beneficial for building core strength. Unlike other abdominal exercises, the plank requires constant contraction, providing greater muscular activation and time under tension. It targets the entire core, including the transversus abdominis, rectus abdominis, internal obliques, and external obliques. The plank also works other muscle groups, such as the glutes, neck, shoulders, arms, upper back, and legs. By incorporating planks into your routine, you can improve your overall performance and reduce the risk of low back pain.

ADVERTISEMENT

Proper form is crucial for maximizing the benefits of the plank. To perform the exercise correctly, stack your elbows beneath your shoulders and extend your legs. Squeeze your abs and glutes, contract your low back, lats, and rhomboids, and keep your gaze facing down. Hold the position for as long as you can while maintaining tension. As you become more comfortable with the plank, you can experiment with variations to target different core muscles. Incorporating planks into your workouts can greatly enhance your training regimen. Start with four rounds of holds for 30 seconds to a minute, focusing on maintaining proper form.

ADVERTISEMENT

AD
Article
news flash